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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 11:06 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jul 21, 2011 10:29 pm
Posts: 1
Hello!

I have a Lacie d2 Network 2 box (1TB), and I've opened it just to check the contents.

It has just a normal sata hard drive there. I was thinking that maybe it is possible to install a hard drive with bigger capacity, to upgrade it. The procedure to upgrade could be something like:

1. Open the unit and remove the hard drive
2. Plug the default Hard drive into a desktop or with some kind of USB adapter (atm I only have a laptop).
3. Backup the default disk partitions with some kind of linux disk utility (any ideas? I would still have to research about how to do this!).
4. Restore the default partitions to the new hardware, adapting the size according to the new hardware.
5. Install the new hardware. [/list]

Does anyone have any suggestions about how to do this? Was this done already by someone?

I'll keep looking for answers. If I do have any progress, I'll post it here!

Thanks in advance for your comments!


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 22, 2011 10:22 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2008 10:45 am
Posts: 6051
I have no experience with the D2-2, but I suppose it's not very different from other Lacie boxes. According to this site it isn't, and is the complete firmware in the first 2GiB of the disk.

So all you have to do is clone the fist 2GiB, and then recreate/reformat the data partition. You'll have to boot your PC in Linux, you could use a Linux Live CD or -USB stick. Use the desktop icons to mount the internal disk with write access. Find out which mountpoint is used (probably something starting with /mnt or /media). Connect the old disk using an USB to SATA convertor (or a external USB enclosure, which is the same).
Open a terminal (command prompt) and type:
Code:
sudo fdisk -l
This gives a list of all detected disks, and their partitions. I suppose the NAS disk will be sdb or sdc. Now copy the first 2GiB to a file:
Code:
sudo dd if=/dev/sdc of=/path/to/internal/disk/dumpfile bs=1M count=2k
Disconnect the old disk, and connect the new one. Copy the first 2GiB back:
Code:
sudo dd if=/path/to/internal/disk/dumpfile of=/dev/sdc
Then recreate the data partition:
Code:
sudo fdisk /dev/sdc
Delete primary partition 2, and add a new primary partition, (default start and end sectors). Write the new partition table, and finally create a filesystem on it:
Code:
sudo mke2fs -j /dev/sdc2
This will create a ext3 filesystem. It should be xfs, but there are issues in external created xfs filesystems in Lacie nasses. You can use the webinterface for reformatting it xfs, if you like.
For safety flush the buffers:
Code:
sudo sync


Now your NAS should be able to use the new disk.
(BTW, this will only suffice for disks of max 2TiB. Bigger disks cannot be partitioned using an 'IBM-compatible' partition table.)

Doublecheck in all cases that you are writing to the right disk. You won't get a warning when you overwrite your system disk.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2015 7:59 am 
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Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2015 7:34 am
Posts: 31
Location: Indonesian
I have same problem with TS, I have D2 Network 2 with 1TiB Capacity and almost full, I want replace 1TiB with a new fresh disk 2TiB but i don't know method partition configuration, Anybody help? Thanks

Maybe can help you, Please look beside thread for detail information :

viewtopic.php?f=238&t=14439&p=94605#p94605


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